Audio Book Samples

Sunday, July 9, 2017

Hugh Martin 1822-1885


MARTIN, HUGH (1822–1885), minister of the free church of Scotland, born at Aberdeen on 11 Aug. 1822, was son of Alexander Martin, and was educated at the grammar school and Marischal College of his native city. He had a distinguished career in the university classes, obtaining, among numerous prizes, the Gray bursary, the highest mathematical reward at Marischal College. He graduated M.A. in April 1839, and subsequently attended the theological classes at King's College, Aberdeen. He was in his student days opposed to the 'non-intrusion' party, which in 1843 became the free church; but at the general assembly of the church of Scotland in 1842 he was converted by a speech of Dr. Cunningham to free church principles. Licensed as a minister in 1843, he was appointed in 1844 to Panbride, near Carnoustie, in the presbytery of Arbroath, to build up the free church charge after the disruption. Martin remained at Panbride till 1868, when he was called to the important charge of Free Greyfriars in Edinburgh. This position he held till June 1865, when he retired owing to ill-health. In 1866-8 Martin acted as examiner in mathematics for the degree of M.A. in the university of Edinburgh, which conferred upon him in 1872 the degree of doctor of divinity. In the debates in the general assembly of the free church Martin was a frequent and an able speaker. On his retirement from Greyfriars, Martin took a house at Lasswade, near Edinburgh, where he occupied himself with music and mathematics. He died 14 June 1885.
Martin was a frequent contributor to the 'British and Foreign Evangelical Review' and the 'Transactions of the London Mathematical Society.' His works comprise: 1. 'Christ's Presence in the Gospel History,' 8vo, London, 1860. 2. 'The Prophet Jonah, his Character and Mission to Nineveh,' 8vo, London, 1866. 3. 'A Study of Trilinear Co-ordinates,' 8vo, Cambridge, 1867. 4. 'The Atonement,' 8vo, London, 1870. 5. 'National Education,' 8vo, Edinburgh, 1872. 6. 'Mutual Eligibility,' 8vo, Edinburgh, 1872. 7. 'Relations between Christ's Headship over Church and State,' 8vo, Edinburgh, 1875. 8. 'The Shadow of Calvary,' 8vo, Edinburgh, 1875. 9. 'The Westminster Doctrine of the Inspiration of Scripture,' 8vo, London, 1877 (this work reached a fifth edition in the same year). 10. 'A Sequel to "The Westminster Doctrine of the Inspiration of Scripture,"' 8vo, London, 1877.
[Information obtained from Dr. Martin's son, the Rev. Alexander Martin, M.A., one of the ministers of Morningside Free Church, Edinburgh.]
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Martin,_Hugh_(DNB00)


http://articles.ochristian.com/article15445.shtml      Hugh Martin lived from 1822 to 1885, through some of the most interesting, turbulent and consequential years of Scottish church life. He was born in 1822 (although some sources date the year as 1821), and studied in his native Aberdeen. He was a distinguished mathematician while at Marischal College, and studied theology at King's. While listening to a speech by William Cunningham, he was won over to the cause which would result in the Disruption of 1843; Martin's ordination as a Free Church minister took place the following year.
      Hugh Martin's first charge was in the Forfar parish of Panbride, where his famous son -- the future Principal Alexander Martin of New College -- was born in 1857. Martin remained at Panbride until called to Free Greyfriars, Edinburgh, in 1858, where he remained until he retired through ill-health in 1865. James Begg, John Kennedy and Hugh Martin formed a redoubtable triumvirate set for the defence of Calvinistic orthodoxy in a day of compromise and of controversy. Some of Martin's best work appeared in the British and Foreign Evangelical Review, and, in the words of G.N.M. Collins, "in him, penetrating theological insight was matched with warm evangelical fervour".      Hugh Martin's publications covered both mathematical and theological topics, but the mathematician comes through in the theologian. His works are clear, logical and thorough, as he works through the implications of his argument. He uses the language of mathematics explicitly in places: "this train of thought leans us on the verge of a very great enlargement or (to use the language of geometry) extension of our theorem". He is a shining example of the old Scottish ideal of scholarship and piety combined. The degree of Doctor of Divinity from Edinburgh in 1872 was a fitting tribute to his theological acumen.      One of his early theological works was Christ's Presence in the Gospel History (1867), published as The Abiding Presence. Martin's starting-point is to conjoin the opening words of Matthew's Gospel -- "The book of the generation of Jesus Christ" -- with the closing promise of the same book -- "I am with you always, even to the end of the world". The Gospel, says Martin, purports to be a history, and is also pregnant with the promise of the presence of Jesus Christ.      If all we had were the biographical narrative, it would interest us as a record of great words and powerful deeds, but it would only be the record of dead history. And if all we had were the promised presence of Christ, then we could never define the Person whose promise it is to be with us always. The presence gives reality to the biography, while the biography gives manifestation to the presence.      Martin's work is a powerful directive regarding the handling of the Gospel materials. The late nineteenth century Scottish Church was to wrestle with the burgeoning science of critical Old Testament scholarship, which seemed to re-write the Bible; but New Testament scholarship was not far behind in introducing new approaches to the biblical text, questioning the supernatural element of the miracle stories and championing Jesus as the supreme critic of the Old Testament. The critics made Jesus a child of his times, and in doing so drove a wedge between the historical Jesus and the later theological tradition. The phenomenon known as Christianity was said to have had little to do with the historical Jesus.      But for Hugh Martin and his evangelical contemporaries, there was no such divergence. True religion is a matter of real communion with God in Christ. And that communion was not merely an association with the post-resurrection church and its witness to the teaching of Jesus. No, says Martin: "you do not deal with reminiscences of Christ -- memories and mementoes of Him, however accurate; conceptions, notions, ideas concerning Him, however true; no, nor even with mere doctrines concerning Him, however truly divine and infinitely precious in their own place as these unquestionably are. You deal with HIM and He with you".




1. 'Christ's Presence in the Gospel History,' 8vo, London, 1860.
    http://www.westminsterconfession.org/the-doctrines-of-grace/christs-presence-in-the-gospel-history.php


2. 'The Prophet Jonah, his Character and Mission to Nineveh,' 8vo, London, 1866.


3. 'A Study of Trilinear Co-ordinates,' 8vo, Cambridge, 1867.
    Third Edition 1889


4. 'The Atonement,' 8vo, London, 1870.
The Atonement: In Its Relation to The Covenant, The Priesthood, The Intercession of our Lord - 1877


5. 'National Education,' 8vo, Edinburgh, 1872.


6. 'Mutual Eligibility,' 8vo, Edinburgh, 1872.
    Free Church Tracts


7. 'Relations between Christ's Headship over Church and State,' 8vo, Edinburgh, 1875.


8. 'The Shadow of Calvary,' 8vo, Edinburgh, 1875. Borrow 1983 Banner of Truth Trust Edition
    E-Book from monergism.com   E-Book at gracegems.org


9. 'The Westminster Doctrine of the Inspiration of Scripture,' 8vo, London, 1877 (this work reached a fifth edition in the same year).
 The Westminster Doctrine of the Inspiration of Scripture: (With a Prefatory Note on the Free Church College committee's Report, and with Remarks on Marcus Dods's Recent Sermon) - 1890


10. 'A Sequel to "The Westminster Doctrine of the Inspiration of Scripture,"' 8vo, London, 1877.
      Letters to Marcus Dods, D.D.   Copy 2  Copy 3  Copy 4


Holy Scripture Free in the Schools of Scotland: Speech Delivered in the General Assembly of the Free Church of Scotland on Thursday, May 30, 1872

Sunday, June 18, 2017

Thomas Hog 1628-1692

Minister of the gospel at Kiltearn, in Ross.

 HOG, THOMAS (1628–1692), Scottish divine, was born at Tain, Ross-shire, in the beginning of 1628, ‘of honest parents, native Highlanders, somewhat above the vulgar rank’ (Stevenson, Memoirs of the Life of Mr. Thomas Hog). He was educated at Tain grammar school, and Marischal College, Aberdeen, where he proceeded to the degree of M.A. In 1654 he received license, and became chaplain to John, earl of Sutherland. On 24 Oct. 1654 he was ordained minister of Kiltearn, a parish six miles from Dingwall, on the shore of Cromarty Firth, and entered on the discharge of his duties with great ardour. In the controversy between the resolutionists and protesters, then at its height, he sided warmly with the protesters, and was in consequence deposed in 1661 by the synod of Ross. Hog then retired to Knockgandy in Auldearn, Nairn, where he continued to minister in private. In July 1668 he was delated by the Bishop of Moray for preaching in his own house and ‘keeping conventicles.’ For these offences he was imprisoned for some time in Forres, but was at length liberated at the intercession of the Earl of Tweeddale, upon giving bail to appear when called on. Not having, however, desisted from preaching, ‘letters of intercommuning’ were in August 1675 issued against him, forbidding all persons to harbour or help him in any way. He was arrested in January 1677, and next month was committed to the Tolbooth of Edinburgh, whence he was taken to the Bass Rock. It is said that, at the instigation of Archbishop Sharp, he was confined in the lowest and worst dungeon in the place. In October 1677, owing to some influence exerted on his behalf, he was brought back to the Tolbooth, and in a short time liberated altogether, but forbidden to go beyond ‘the bounds of Kintyre’ ‘under the pain of one thousand merks.’ In 1679 he was again imprisoned in Edinburgh, but was soon liberated. From this time he seems to have laboured without molestation until November 1683, when he was charged before the Scottish privy council with keeping ‘house conventicles.’ As he refused to answer the charge, it was held as confessed, and he was fined in five thousand merks, and banished from Scotland in January 1684. He went to London, and was arrested on suspicion of complicity in Monmouth's plot, but was released in 1685, and fled to Holland, where the Prince of Orange made him one of his chaplains. He returned to Scotland in 1688, and in 1691 was appointed chaplain to the king, and restored to the parish of Kiltearn, as he is said to have predicted thirty years before would be the case. On 4 Jan. 1692 he died, and at his own request was buried underneath the threshold of his church door, with this inscription over the remains: ‘This stone shall bear witness against the parishioners of Kiltearn if they bring an ungodly minister in here.’
[Memoirs of the Life of Mr. Thomas Hog, by Andrew Stevenson, Edinburgh, 1756; Wodrow Correspondence; Scott's Fasti Eccl. Scot. i. 395, v. 299–301.]

 https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Hog,_Thomas_(DNB00)

Biographical Address by Rev. Robert McCurley on the life of Thomas Hog 

Memoirs of the Life of Mr. Thomas, Minister of the Gospel at Kiltearn, in Ross; containing some very signal displays of the divine condescension to him, and to others by him.  To which is annexed an abstracts of Mr. Hog's manner of dealing with persons under conviction.  - 1846

An Abridgement of the Memoirs of the Life of the Rev. Mr. Thomas Hog. Minister of the Gospel at Kiltearn, in Ross.  containing, Some wonderful and glorious displays of the divine condescension to him, and to others by him.  To which isw annexed, An Abstract of Mr Hog's manner of dealing with Souls under their first Awakenings.  By W. Augustus Clarke - 1779
The Covenanter, 1830-43
Thomas Houston, Editor


The Covenanter started in 1830 as a monthly publication but a new series began in 1841 as a bi-monthly publication and has become the official magazine of the Reformed Presbyterian Church. It came about as a result of the differences between the Rev Thomas Houston and the Rev John Paul over the doctrine of the civil magistrate.
In December 1830 Houston, apparently at his own expense, published the first copy of the Covenanter setting out his views.
The aim of the magazine was to put forth the ‘system of religious doctrine and discipline of the ’good old cause’. It deals with the events and social problems of the period as well as providing information about the Reformed Synod and Presbytery meetings, congregations and ministers.
Only the magazines from 1830-43 have been digitised.


http://www.presbyterianhistoryireland.com/web-resources/presbyterian-magazines/search/the-covenanter/


Membership in the Presbyterian Historical Society of Ireland is required to access the content of these publications. Go to http://www.presbyterianhistoryireland.com/membership/ to become a member.


  • Series 1, Volume 1, Contents
  • Series 1, Volume 1, Issue 1, December 1830
  • Series 1, Volume 1, Issue 2, January 1831
  • Series 1, Volume 1, Issue 3, February 1831
  • Series 1, Volume 1, Issue 4, March 1831
  • Series 1, Volume 1, Issue 5, April 1831
  • Series 1, Volume 1, Issue 6, May 1831
  • Series 1, Volume 1, Issue 7, June 1831
  • Series 1, Volume 1, Issue 8, July 1831
  • Series 1, Volume 1, Issue 9, August 1831
  • Series 1, Volume 1, Issue 10, September 1831
  • Series 1, Volume 1, Issue 11, October 1831
  • Series 1, Volume 1, Issue 12, November 1831
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Contents
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Issue 13, December 1831
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Issue 14, January 1832
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Issue 15, February 1832
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Issue 16, March 1832
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Issue 17, April 1832
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Issue 18, May 1832
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Issue 19, June 1832
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Issue 20, July 1832
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Issue 21, August 1832
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Issue 22, September 1832
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Issue 23, October 1832
  • Series 1, Volume 2, Issue 24, November 1832
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Contents
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Issue 25, December 1832
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Issue 26, January 1833
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Issue 27, February 1833
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Issue 28, March 1833
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Issue 29, April 1833
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Issue 30, May 1833
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Issue 31, June 1833
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Issue 32, July 1833
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Issue 33, August 1833
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Issue 34, September 1833
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Issue 35, October 1833
  • Series 1, Volume 3, Issue 36, November 1833
  • Series 2, Volume 1, Preface
  • Series 2, Volume 1, Issue 1, January 1834
  • Series 2, Volume 1, Issue 2, March 1834
  • Series 2, Volume 1, Issue 3, May 1834
  • Series 2, Volume 1, Issue 4, July 1834
  • Series 2, Volume 1, Issue 5, September 1834
  • Series 2, Volume 1, Issue 6, November 1834
  • Series 2, Volume 2, Narrative and Plea
  • Series 2, Volume 2, Issue 7, January 1835
  • Series 2, Volume 2, Issue 8, March 1835
  • Series 2, Volume 2, Issue 9, May 1835
  • Series 2, Volume 2, Issue 10, July 1835
  • Series 2, Volume 2, Issue 11, September 1835
  • Series 2, Volume 2, Issue 12, November 1835
  • Series 2, Volume 3, Contents
  • Series 2, Volume 3, Issue 13, January 1836
  • Series 2, Volume 3, Issue 14, March 1836
  • Series 2, Volume 3, Issue 15, May 1836
  • Series 2, Volume 3, Issue 16, July 1836
  • Series 2, Volume 3, Issue 17, September 1836
  • Series 2, Volume 3, Issue 18, November 1836
  • Series 2, Volume 4, Contents
  • Series 2, Volume 4, Issue 19, January 1837
  • Series 2, Volume 4, Issue 20, March 1837
  • Series 2, Volume 4, Issue 21, May 1837
  • Series 2, Volume 4, Issue 22, July 1837
  • Series 2, Volume 4, Issue 23, September 1837
  • Series 2, Volume 4, Issue 24, November 1837
  • Series 2, Volume 5, Contents
  • Series 2, Volume 5, Issue 25, February 1838
  • Series 2, Volume 5, Issue 26, March 1838
  • Series 2, Volume 5, Issue 27, May 1838
  • Series 2, Volume 5, Issue 28, July 1838
  • Series 2, Volume 5, Issue 29, September 1838
  • Series 2, Volume 5, Issue 30, November 1838
  • Series 2, Volume 6, Contents
  • Series 2, Volume 6, Issue 31, January 1839
  • Series 2, Volume 6, Issue 32, March 1839
  • Series 2, Volume 6, Issue 33, May 1839
  • Series 2, Volume 6, Issue 34, July 1839
  • Series 2, Volume 6, Issue 35, September 1839
  • Series 2, Volume 6, Issue 36, November 1839
  • Series 2, Volume 7, Contents
  • Series 2, Volume 7, Issue 37, January 1840
  • Series 2, Volume 7, Issue 38, March 1840
  • Series 2, Volume 7, Issue 39, May 1840
  • Series 2, Volume 7, Issue 40, July 1840
  • Series 2, Volume 7, Issue 41, September 1840
  • Series 2, Volume 7, Issue 42, November 1840
  • Series 2, Volume 8, Contents
  • Series 2, Volume 8, Issue 43, January 1841
  • Series 2, Volume 8, Issue 44, March 1841
  • Series 2, Volume 8, Issue 45, May 1841
  • Series 2, Volume 8, Issue 46, July 1841
  • Series 2, Volume 8, Issue 47, September 1841
  • Series 2, Volume 8, Issue 48, November 1841
  • Series 2, Volume 9, Contents
  • Series 2, Volume 9, Issue 49, January 1842
  • Series 2, Volume 9, Issue 50, March 1842
  • Series 2, Volume 9, Issue 51, May 1842
  • Series 2, Volume 9, Issue 52, July 1842
  • Series 2, Volume 9, Issue 53, September 1842
  • Series 2, Volume 9, Issue 54, November 1842
  • Series 2, Volume 10, Contents
  • Series 2, Volume 10, Declaration
  • Series 2, Volume 10, Issue 55, January 1843
  • Series 2, Volume 10, Issue 56, March 1843
  • Series 2, Volume 10, Issue 57, May 1843
  • Series 2, Volume 10, Issue 58, July 1843
  • Series 2, Volume 10, Issue 59, September 1843
  • Series 2, Volume 10, Issue 60, November 1843

  • Thomas Houston 1803-1882






    Thomas Houston was a minister in the Reformed Presbyterian Church of Ireland in Knockbracken and editor of "The Covenanter" beginning in 1830.


    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2017/1/18/thomas-houston-1803-1882?rq=Thomas%20Houston




    The Christian Magistrate: A Discourse. - 1832




    The Reviewer Reviewed, and The Covenanter and Testimony of the Reformed Presbyterian Church Vindicated, - 1833  At Google Books


    The Intercession of Christ and Exposition of John XVII: with Prayer, Our Grand Duty and Privilege, and Exposition of the Lord's Prayer - 1882 - Thomas Houston


    The Divine Commendation of Abraham, or, Parental Duties; and the Blessing Resulting from their Faithful Performance - 1844 - Thomas Houston


    The Fellowship Prayer-Meeting: The Institution, Nature, History, and Advantages of Select Christian Fellowship; with Directions for Conducting Social Religious Exercises - 1856 - Thomas Houston







    The Covenanter


    A periodical devoted to the principles of the Reformed Presbyterian Church.


    Editor: James McLeod Willson (1809-1866)


    Son of James R. Willson, born near Elizabeth, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, November 17, 1809. He graduated from Union College in 1829.  He studied theology under the direction of his father, and was licensed by the Presbytery, June 5, 1834.  He was ordained by the same Presbytery, and installed pastor of the First congregation of Philadelphia, November 27, 1834.  He was elected Professor of Theology in the Allegheny Seminary, May 31, 1859.  He authored numerous pamphlets and books expounding Covenanter principles.  He died at his residence in Allegheny, August 31, 1866.
    http://www.covenanter.org/reformed/2015/6/29/james-mcleod-willson-1809-1866




    From the RP Archives: http://www.rparchives.org/covenanter.html

    From Google Books:

    Volume 3 - 1847-48 (August 1847 - July 1848)  Editor: James M. Willson


    Volume 4 - 1848-49 (August 1848 - July 1849)  Editor: James M. Willson


    Volume 6 - 1850-51 (August 1850 - July 1851)   Editor: James M. Willson


    Volume 7 - 1851-52 (August 1851 - July 1852)   Editor: James M. Willson


    Volume 9 - 1853-54 (August 1853 - July 1854)   Editor: James M. Willson


    Volume 11 - 1855-56 (August 1855 - July 1856)  Editor: James M. Willson) 


    Volume 12 - 1856-57 (August 1856 - July 1857)  Editor: James M. Willson


    Volume 13 - 1857-58 (September 1857 - July 1858) Editor: James M. Willson


    Volume 15 - 1859-60 (October 1859 - July 1860)  Editor: James M. Willson


    Volume 16 - 1860-61 (September 1860 - June 1861)  Editor: James M. Willson

    Wednesday, April 19, 2017

    James Wilkinson Dale 1812-1881







    James Wilkinson Dale was born October 16, 1812, at Cantwell’s Bridge (now Odessa) Delaware. He was the third son and the fourth child of Richard Colgate Dale, M.D. and Margaret (Fitzgerald) Dale. Following a term studying law, he turned to prepare for the ministry, initially at the Andover Theological Seminary. From his second year on, he continued his studies at Princeton, graduating there in 1835. He was appointed by the American Board to serve as a missionary in India, but could not gather the requisite financial support and had to withdraw. Undeterred, he next entered upon medical studies to further prepare for missions work, but upon graduation in 1838, entered into a term of service as an agent for the American Bible Society, 1838-1845. He later served as pastor of several churches near Philadelphia. It was during the time of these several pastorates that he wrote his famous works on the subject of baptism.
    http://www.thisday.pcahistory.org/tag/james-wilkinson-dale/


    DALE, James Wilkinson, author, born in Cant-well's Bridge (now Odessa), Del., 16 October 1812; died in Media, Pennsylvania, 19 April 1881. He was graduated at the University of Pennsylvania, in 1831, at the head of his class, and began the study of law, but abandoned it for that of theology, which he pursued at Andover and Princeton. He wished to become a missionary, and was appointed by the American board to a station in India; but financial embarrassment prevented his departure, and to fit himself more thoroughly for mission work he entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, where he received his degree in 1838. He had been ordained at Andover in 1837, and, after supplying pulpits in Philadelphia, was agent of the American Bible society in 1838-'45. He then held pastorates at Ridley, Middletown, Media, and Wayne, Pennsylvania, till 1876, when he retired and devoted himself to literature. Dr. Dale was at one time a leader in the temperance movement in Media. The University of Pennsylvania gave him the degree of D.D. in 1868. His principal work is an exhaustive "Inquiry into the Meaning of Baptizo as determined by Usage," including "Classic Baptism " (Philadelphia, 1867): "Judaic Baptism" (1869); "Johannie Baptism" (1871); and "Christie and Patristic Baptism" (1874). Dr. Dale's conclusions are adverse to the views of the Baptists on the subject; but the work is considered an authority by scholars of all other denominations, and has received from them the highest praise. A memorial of Dr. Dale was written by the Rev. James Roberts, D. D. (Philadelphia, printed privately, 1886).
    http://famousamericans.net/jameswilkinsondale/


    http://www.biblicalcyclopedia.com/D/dale-james-wilkinson-dd.html


    A Memorial of Rev. James W. Dale - 1886 - Roberts, James







    Classic Baptism was published in 1867;
    Judaic Baptism in 1869;
    Johannic Baptism in 1871;
    Christic and Patristic Baptism, a volume approximately twice the length of the former works, was then published in 1874.


    James W. Dale works at Penn State Online Books Page


    Classic Baptism. An Inquiry into the Meaning of the Word "baptize", as Determined by the Usage of Classical Greek Writers - 1867 - Dale, James Wilkinson 1812-1881


    An Inquiry into the Usage of Baptizo and the Nature of Judaic Baptism as shown by Jewish and Patristic Writings - 1870 - Dale, James Wilkinson 1812-1881


    An Inquiry into the Usage of Baptizo, and the Nature of Johannic Baptism, as Exhibited in the Holy Scriptures - 1871 - Dale, James Wilkinson 1812-1881


    An Inquiry into the Usage of Baptizo, and the Nature of Christic and Patristic Baptism, as Exhibited in the Holy Scriptures and Patristic Writings - 1874 - Dale, James Wilkinson 1812-1881


    The Cup and the Cross: Or, The Baptism of Calvary, "One Baptism", the Ground and the Key to All Other Bible Baptisms: Exposition of Mark 10:38, 39, Before the Synod of Philadelphia. - 1872 - Dale, James Wilkinson 1812-1881



    Tuesday, March 28, 2017

    Andrew Gray 1633-1656


    Andrew Gray (1633–1656), was a Scottish divine.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Gray_(17th-century_divine)


    http://digitalpuritan.net/andrew-gray/ (Biographical Sketch and Links to Works)


    http://www.truecovenanter.com/gray/index.html (Biographical Sketch and Links to Works)


    http://www.newble.co.uk/gray/sermons.html (Links to Works)
    http://www.newble.co.uk/gray/literature.html (Links to Related Literature)
    http://www.newble.co.uk/gray/biography2.html (Biographical Sketch)


    Dictionary of National Biography, Volume XXIII, page 2 - 1890

    ‘The Whole Works of the Reverend and Pious Mr. Andrew Gray,’ Glasgow, 1762, 1789, 1803, 1813, 8vo; Paisley, 1762, 1769, 8vo; Falkirk, 1789, 8vo; Aberdeen, 1839, 8vo (with preface by the Rev. W. King Tweedie). From a manuscript collection of sixty-one other sermons, eleven were published as vol. i. of an intended series, with preface by the Rev. John Willison of Dundee, in 1746. The fifty remaining sermons appeared later in another volume as ‘Select Sermons by … Mr. Andrew Gray,’ Edinburgh, 1765, 8vo; Falkirk, 1792, 8vo. From the 1746 volume was reissued separately, with a Gaelic translation by J. Gillies (Glasgow, 1851, 12mo), the sermon on Canticles iii. 11. Two single sermons, not apparently published elsewhere, one on Exod. xxxiv. 6, the other on Job xxiii. 3, appeared respectively at Edinburgh in 1774 and at Glasgow in 1782.1863


    The Mystery of Faith Opened Up: or, Some Sermons Concerning Faith. Revised and Corrected (Edinburgh, 1671)


    The Mystery of Faith Opened Up; or, Some Sermons Concerning Faith ... Whereunto are Added Other three Sermons, Two Concerning the Great Salvation ... and a Third Concerning Death - 1678 - Gray, Andrew, 1633-1656; Trail, Robert, 1642-1716; Stirling, John, M.A.


    Great and Precious Promises: or, Some Sermons Concerning the Promises. Last impr., correction - 1736


    The Works of the Reverend and Pious Andrew Gray (Glasgow, 1762)


    The Works of the Reverend and Pious Mr. Andrew Gray, Late Minister of the Gospel in Glasgow - 1813 - Gray, Andrew, 1633-1656


    The Works of the Reverend and Pious Andrew Gray - 1839- Gray, Andrew, 1633-1656; Tweedie, W. K. (William King), 1803-1863

    Friday, March 17, 2017

    Alexander Smellie ("Smiley") 1857-1923


    Alexander Smellie (1857-1923) was an Original Secession Church minister and writer. Born at Stranraer, he graduated at Edinburgh, and after theological studies was ordained and inducted to Stranraer in 1880. During 1892-4 he edited the Sunday School Chronicle in London, but returned to Scotland to minister in Thurso (1894-1900) and Carluke (1900-23).


    Smellie always had the vision of ‘a reunited Evangelical and Presbyterian Church of Scotland’, and retained cordial relations with those in other Churches. For some years he contributed weekly to the Sunday School Times of Philadelphia. He wrote biographies of R. M. M’Cheyne and Evan Hopkins, and a number of devotional works, but is chiefly remembered for his beautifully written Men of the Covenant, the 1924 edition of which was reproduced in 1975 by the Trust, and which has been translated into several languages.


    [Slightly edited from the article on Smellie by J. D. Douglas in Dictionary of Scottish Church History and Theology.]
    https://banneroftruth.org/us/about/banner-authors/alexander-smellie/


    Life of Rev. Alexander Smellie, D.D. - 1923 - Morton, Robert, 1849-1932
    Life of Rev. Alexander Smellie, D.D. (1857-1923), by Rev. Professor Robert Morton (1849-1932), extracted from The Original Secession Magazine, Vol 29, Nos. 7, 8, 9, 10, July-October 1923.


    Men of the Covenant: The Story of the Scottish Church in the Years of the Persecution - 1903 - Smellie, Alexander, 1857-1923


    Men of the Covenant, Volume 1 - 1908 - Smellie, Alexander, 1857-1923


    Men of the Covenant, Volume 2 - 1908 - Smellie, Alexander, 1857-1923


    Robert Murray McCheyne - 1913 - Smellie, Alexander, 1857-1923


    In the Hour of Silence: A Book of Daily Meditations for a Year - 1899 - Smellie, Alexander, 1857-1923


    In the Hour of Silence: A Book of Daily Meditations for a Year - 1906 - Smellie, Alexander, 1857-1923


    In the Hour of Silence: A Book of Daily Meditations for a Year - 1923 - Smellie, Alexander, 1857-1923


    Service and Inspiration - 1904 - Smellie, Alexander, 1857-1923


    Why Keep the Sabbath? - 1902


    Lift Up Your Heart, Four Addresses on Sanctification - 1915


    Out of the Desert a Gift, A Book of Counsel and Company for the Sabbath Evening - 1917


    The Well by the Way, A Second Book of Counsel and Company for the Sabbath Evening - 1918


    Evan Henry Hopkins. A Memoir, Etc. [With Portraits.] - 1920


    The Reformation in Its Literature - 1925

    Saturday, January 7, 2017

    James Isaac Good 1850-1924
      

    James Isaac Good (1850-1924) was an American Reformed church clergyman and historian.  He was born at York, Pennsylvania.  he graduated at Lafayette College in 1872 and at Union Theological Seminary in 1875.  For thirty years (1875-1905) his pastorates were in Pennsylvania.  Later, he held a position at the Central theological Seminary (Dayton, Ohio), and was elected president of the General Synod of the Reformed Church in the United States.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Isaac_Good




    He wrote: